Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Temples of the King (Day Two in Bangkok)



Meh..... kita nak sambung citer kat Bangkok.  
U nak baca carry on jer lah.  U tak nak baca, scroll tengok gambar jer lah.
Citer hari kedua di Bangkok, 11/04/14.

Ready at the hotel lobby around 9.00am.  We were going for a tour package, visiting three temples and then going for a river cruise.  So... took photos while waiting for our van.

Our friendly tour guide took us to get our breakfast first.  Awal pagi makan nasi ayam but the nasi ayam memang nyaman.  Lembut je rice nya.  Tak cukup dengan itu.... ordered omelette lagi. And also bought some local Thai kuih muih kat makcik yang berjual tepi jalan.... Gosh... their kuih or dessert memang yummy. Bersantan pekat dan kuih nya very soft and sedap.  Kalau dua minggu duduk kat Thailand memang badan naik macam gajah Thailand tu....

We really enjoyed eating Thai food!!


From there, we naik tuk tuk to go to Wat Traimit. See.... our tour guide memang friendly. He voluntarily became our photographer for that day.



Wat Traimit or Temple of the Golden Buddha is well known for its 3-metre tall, and more than 5 tons of solid gold.  The Golden Buddha, officially titled Phra Phuttha Maha Suwan Patimakon, is the world's largest solid gold statue......   Lima tan emas beb......

Photos taken at Wat Traimit
Our next destination was The Grand Palace. Bangkok's Grand Palace was not only the home of the King and his court, but also the entire administrative seat of government. Within the crenelated walls were the country's war ministry, state departments, and even the mint. Thai Kings stopped living in the palace full time around the turn of the twentieth century, but the complex remains the seat of power and spiritual heart of the Thai kingdom.
The Grand Palace is partly divided into:
- Outer Court
- Central Court
- Temple of the Emerald Buddha
- Phra Maha Monthien Palace
- Dusit Maha Prasat
- Chakri Maha Prasat
The Outer Court, near where the entrance to the complex today, housed the government departments in which the king was directly involved, such as civil administration, including the army, and the treasury. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha takes up one corner of the complex next to the outer court.
Pelancong dari China.  Big group.  Photo taken at the Outer Court.
The view at the Outer Court.  Cone shaped trees along the way...
In the middle is the Central Court, where the residence of the king and the halls for conducting state business were located. Visitors are allowed to look at the fronts of the buildings in the central court, but only two of the throne halls are open to the public, and only on weekdays.
Behind the central court was the inner court. This was where the king's royal consorts and daughters lived. The inner court was like a small city entirely populated by women and boys under the age of puberty. Even though no royalty currently reside in the inner court, it is still completely closed off to the public.

Trimming in progress.... 
The Temple of the Emerald Buddha
Wat Phra Si Rattanasasadaram, generally called the Temple of the Emerald Buddha in English or Wat Phra Gaeo in Thai, is a temple purpose-built to house a Buddha image carved from a large solid piece of green jadite. The "Emerald Buddha" is carved from a block of jade. It is an object of national veneration and crowds come to pay respect to the memory of the Buddha and His Teachings on certain days of the weeks when it is open to the public

Photos taken in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha

Photos inside the Grand Palace....
Beautiful and impressive architecture...

Photos inside the Grand Palace still....
pardon me... I could not remember which part is this...

Beautiful and impressive architecture...
very very tempted to take a lot of photos, selfie or cray cray ones...
Chakri Maha Prasat
The modern central court is dominated by the curious Chakri Maha Prasat hall. The hall was built by King Rama V and completed in 1882. Its unusual design is due to some controversy during its construction. The original architect was a Briton working in Singapore named John Clunich. Rama V wanted an entirely western look to his new home, but others in the court argued that the king's residence and throne hall should reflect Siamese motifs. Thus the domed roof was replaced by a Thai styled roof. It should be no surprise that the Thai nickname for the building is the 'westerner with a Thai hat'.
Still photos inside the Grand Palace.... 
pardon me... I could not remember which part is this...
Beautiful and impressive architecture... 

ooooppss.... the reclining Buddha shud not be in this photocollage...hehehe
After the long hours we spent in The Grand Palace, we proceeded to Wat Pho. Wat Pho (the Temple of the Reclining Buddha), or Wat Phra Chetuphon, is located behind the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and a must-do for any first-time visitor in Bangkok.


It's one of the largest temple complexes in the city and famed for its giant reclining Buddha that measures 46 metres long and is covered in gold leaf. The highlight for most people visiting Wat Pho is the Reclining Buddha. 

The figures here are impressive: 15 metres tall, 46 metres long, so large it feels like it has been squeezed into the building. The Buddha's feet are 5 metres long and exquisitely decorated in mother-of-pearl illustrations of auspicious 'laksanas' (characteristics) of the Buddha. 108 is a significant number, referring to the 108 positive actions and symbols that helped lead Buddha to perfection.

... extracted from bangkokforvisitors.com
Photos inside the Wat Pho (the Temple of the Reclining Buddha)

For a little good luck, we purchased a bowl of coins at the entrance of the hall which we dropped in the 108 bronze bowls which line the length of the walls. Dropping the small pennies in makes a nice ringing sound and even if your wishes don’t come true, the money goes towards helping the monks renovate and preserve Wat Pho.

Phew...... lom habis lagi.  Done with the temples visit, we went for a canal river cruise. No photos available as I had accidentally deleted the photos from my phone.  
After the canal cruise, we went to lepak at the famous Khao Shan  Road, known as 'the centre of the backpacking universe'. Packed into a 1km long strip are countless budget guesthouses and mid-range hotels, internet cafes, swanky bars and clubs, restaurants, massage parlours, travel agents, bookshops, market stalls, tattoo shops and much, much more.

Next..... Chatuchak Market and the Songkran Festival


3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear kakak, please next time kitak makan angin, ambik lah gambar clear sikit. Blur blur sik nampak gilak. Geram kamek sik dapat nangga gambar kuih and nasi ayam. .
Cucu nenek kebayan

Tia said...

hshaha.....
paduhal sak ati sik dpt nanggar gambar makanan.... kamera mek org sik berdslr....hihihu sukahati hentam jak...

Ez Vina said...

ala..sayang nya sikda gambar river cruise.

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